Finished

Mom's Flannel Quilt

I’ve made it a goal to document my earliest quilts, and the quilt I made for my mom was definitely one of those!

My very first quilt was made for my daughter. You can read more about that quilt here.

Katie’s quilt took several years to make because I learned fairly quickly that the pattern I’d chosen for her quilt was simply not beginner friendly. When I finally decided to put her quilt aside to learn the basics of quilting so I could finish it with confidence, I turned my attention to simpler quilts. One of those was the classic flannel rag quilt.

I talk about the process of making a flannel quilt here. Believe me, it’s super easy and very, very doable for an absolute beginning quilter.

After I put Kate’s quilt aside, I looked for advice on how to proceed and that’s when the idea of making a flannel rag quilt came up. The deal was sealed when I fell in love with a beautiful flannel fat quarter packet.

I love the soft yellows, greyed blues, and yellow-browns in this collection. I think it looks beautiful, even though it’s a simple quilt. I also love the mix of plaids and prints in the collection. Even though they look like homespuns, they are printed flannels although you could use homespuns in a rag quilt if you like.

After the quilt was finished, I gave it to my mother for Christmas. She didn’t use it much at first, but after she discovered how warm it was, it quickly became her favorite.

As she got older, the heaviness of the quilt (I’d used flannel on both sides and batting in-between) seemed to help her to sleep. She used it every day towards the end, so it not only got a lot of use but also a lot of washings.

I got the quilt back after she passed. It certainly was loved a lot. As I look at it now, I notice skipped stitches that I need to restitch to restore the quilt and protect it from deteriorating. I love how much she loved this quilt and I want to keep it in the family forever so making repairs to it is high on my to-do list.

I made a photo label for the back of the quilt. It’s one of my favorite photos of my mother and me as a baby.

Here are the quilt details:

"A Mother’s Ragtime Melody"
48" x 62"
Pattern: Flannel rag quilt, my pattern
Fabric: Flannel fat quarter pack, purchased at Quiltmakers, Indianapolis
Batting: Quilters Dream Select
Piecing Thread: Aurifil 50 wt 2314 Beige
Quilting Thread: Aurifil 50 wt 2314 Beige
Pieced and quilted by: Jennifer Fulton
Christmas, 2003

The best thing about quilts is that they continue to provide comfort, no matter how much wear they get. As I took a break from taking photos of the quilt to write this post, I turned to find Zora fast asleep on mom’s quilt. Couldn’t resist taking a photo.

tell me…have you ever made a rag quilt?

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

My September Island Batik Challenge

September’s Island Batik Ambassador challenge was to make a quilt for a child, using our new BOB (Block on Board) die for AccuQuilt Go!

With a BOB die, you can cut all the pieces for a quilt block in one run through the cutter. The die I received was for the Spider Web block.

Inspired by the Spider Web block, I decided to create a kid-friendly spider quilt with a Halloween color palette of purple, green, orange and black.

The block pieces you cut with a BOB die all have notches on them. To sew up the block, you arrange the pieces so the notches are all on the same side. The pieces are cut so they align perfectly, with no dog ears. I love that!

To sew the two triangle halves of the block together, you align the notches. I also pressed my seams in different directions so they’d lock when sewing.

I quilted the quilt before adding the spider applique because it was easier. I quilted straight lines out from the center. I didn’t start in the exact center for each line because I knew the spider would cover it up and I didn’t want to crowd the center with quilting.

After quilting, I added the spider applique and stitched down the edge. Batiks don’t really fray but I always coat the edges of my applique with Fabric Modge Podge to prevent fraying. Then I can just straight stitch along the edges instead of having to blanket or satin stitch.

For the backing, I chose a lovely green batik. For the binding, I used a Black Solid batik. Did you know Island Batiks makes solids? They are wonderful, even mixed with cottons. They are easy to sew, hold a nice crisp edge when pressed and are vibrant (and not see through) when used in a quilt.

Click here to view more solids from Island Batik.

Here are the quilt details:

"Boo!"
24” x 24"
Original Design
Fabrics: Island Batik scraps, including Background: Black Solid, Web: #121822280 Mini Dots Copper (Flea Market), BE22-C2 (Blenders), 821706250 (Elementz), 121612250 Round Petal Floral Poppy (Pressed Petals), Leprechaun (Blenders), 111708615 (Vineyard), Spider: Purple (Basics), 111925485 Cherries Blackberry (Petal), 121721495 Branches Eggplant (Blue Moon), 11924475 Garden Tools Grape Juice, 121714120 (Morning Sunshine)
Batting: Hobbs Batting 80/20
Piecing Thread: Aurifil 50 wt. #2692 (Black)
Quilting Thread: Madiera Polyneon 40 wt. 1950 (Green) and Aurifil 50 wt. 6737 (Shamrock Green)
Applique Thread: Aurifil 50 wt. #2130 (Medium Butter), #1243 (Dusty Lavender), #2545 (Medium Purple)
Pieced and quilted by Jennifer Fulton

Thanks for stopping by!

While you’re here, why not take a moment and share what you’ve been working on in my weekly show-and-tell linkup, Wednesday Wait Loss? Click here to read all about it and to link up a photo.

Disclosure: The products featured here were provided to me free of charge by Island Batik, Aurifil, Hobbs, and AccuQuilt GO!

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Tell me..Have you ever used the spider Web block?

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

My Very First Quilt

I realized the other day that I have never blogged about my earliest quilts—the quilts I made before I started a blog. So I thought that from time to time, I’d share them with you.

My very first quilt was made for my daughter. I started it while pregnant with her and finished it years later after I’d made other quilts and finally learned the basics of quilting (including piecing, quilting, and binding).

The story of how that first quilt came to be was the subject of my first blog post back on May 2nd, 2014.

I started the quilt when I was pregnant with my daughter, back in 1996. I finished it in October, 2001 when she was four. In between, I learned how to be a mommy and how to be a quilter.

The class I took on how to make the quilt was taught by a hand piecer, so we learned how to make a template and to use it to trace triangles. I doubt that any of those triangles were perfect but I managed to sew a recognizable square in square, and surround it with triangles to create each block.

None of the points match, but my friend Rhonda who was an experienced quilter showed me how to sew it together so it would lay flat. We discussed border options and came up with a doable plan to add a skinny muslin border followed by a scrappy squares border and a wider print border.

After I finally got the quilt top together (I even took the quilt apart at one point and redid some of the blocks) Rhonda helped me come up with a quilting plan for the center of the quilt—straight lines quilted with my walking foot running from corner to corner in each block. For the skinny inner border, I quilted a straight line down the middle. For the middle border, I stitched in the ditch along each side and for the outer border, I stitched two parallel lines down the middle.

I used a flowery vintage looking flannel for the backing and made a scrappy binding to finish the quilt. Rhonda embroidered a quilt label for me on her embroidery machine.

As I said, I finished the quilt in 2001. It was 1999 when we came up with the plan on how to square the quilt top and add borders. I took the two years in-between to hone my skills as a quilter by making simpler quilts and to hone my skills as a mother to my beautiful little girl.

Here are the quilt details:

"Baby Ocean Waves"
47" x 54"
Pattern: Baby Ocean Waves by Connie Lancaster
Fabric: Baby-themed scraps collected from the scrap barrel at Quilts Plus, Indianapolis
Batting: Quilters Dream Request
Piecing Thread: 50 wt Beige
Quilting Thread: 50 wt White
Pieced and quilted by: Jennifer Fulton
October, 2001

I finished the quilt one weekend while visiting Rhonda. While I did the quilting, Rhonda took my leftover scraps and made a matching doll quilt. (28” x 32”). Both quilts are treasured by my daughter, who graduated from college last year. Maybe one day she’ll have a little boy or girl, and pass the quilts onto them.

tell me…what was your first quilt?

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

My August Island Batik Challenge

August flew past, but just under the wire I’ve finished my August challenge quilt for Island Batik Ambassadors. The challenge for August was to make a star quilt. Here is Starburst, my answer to this challenge.

Immediately, I knew I wanted to use a Sawtooth block in my quilt because it’s one of my favorites.

One day, the idea of using an alternate block with a lot of negative space came to mind, and I knew that was what I wanted.

That’s how Starburst came to be.

When I started choosing colors during the design process, I knew I want to play with background fabrics—moving from light to dark, from the center out.

In addition, I decided I wanted the colors to change too—moving from light to dark.

I made Starburst using scraps from my Island Batik stash. With the basic design in mind, I let my daughter choose the colors to use. She choose teal, purple, and deep red. I love it!

To compliment the design, I chose a simple quilting motif that illustrated the starburst theme.

For the back, I chose a solid color batik called Raisin.

Here are the quilt details:

"Wintertide"
30” x 30"
Original Design
Fabrics: Island Batik scraps, including Backgrounds: 121622035 Bubble Hole Honey, BE22-F1 Dandelion Crumbs, and Custard; Teals: 21819561 Paisley Outlining Teal (Flea Market collection), Parakeet, 11190551 Mini Bubbles Aquamarine, 121823855 Swirl Cool Waters (Paisley Park collection); Purples: 121723485 Pinecone Blackberry (Blue Moon collection), Turtle Shell Blurple (City Culture 2 Uptown collection), 111924475 Garden Tools Grape Juice; Red: 721703390 Turtle Shell Cranberry (City Culture 2 Marketplace collection); Backing: Raisin; Binding:121622035 Bubble Hole Honey
Batting: Hobbs Batting 80/20
Piecing Thread: Aurifil 50 wt. #2610 (Light Blue Grey)
Quilting Thread: Aurifil 50 wt. #2314 (Beige)
Pieced and quilted by Jennifer Fulton

Thanks for stopping by!

While you’re here, why not take a moment and share what you’ve been working on in my weekly show-and-tell linkup, Wednesday Wait Loss? Click here to read all about it and to link up a photo.

Disclosure: The products featured here were provided to me free of charge by Island Batik, Aurifil, Hobbs, and AccuQuilt GO!

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you might also like

Tell me..do you like star quilts? what is your favorite star block?

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!

I really appreciate your comments. Please leave an email address so I can thank you personally!